IPS Scholars Rashid Khalidi and Salim Tamari Awarded Prestigious Accolades

The Institute for Palestine Studies (IPS) is honored to announce that two of its longtime scholars, Rashid Khalidi and Salim Tamari, have recently received awards from the World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES) and the State of Palestine, respectively.

Call for Conference Papers: The Situation of the Jordan Valley and Area C

At this year's annual conference, the Institute for Palestine Studies will examine the situation of the Jordan Valley and Area C across four themes that, together, look at the background of the area, the impact of the settlements, the political and legal strategies and activism, as well as popular support in the context of development. Paper proposals should be submitted no later than May, 28, 2018.

The Nakba at 70

Seventy years on, Palestinians in Jerusalem continue to endure systematic attempts to force them out of their homes, while in the West Bank they struggle to remain in their ancestral homeland amid an ever-expanding settler-colonial project. In Gaza, where Palestinians are imprisoned en masse, they suffer the consequences of repeated military assaults and an ongoing siege, now in its 14th year. At this critical time, we remain committed to protecting the facts on Palestine and hope that you will find these publications illuminating.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: Digital Content Production Intern

The Institute for Palestine Studies USA, Inc., (IPS-USA) has an opening for a Summer 2018 intern in the exciting field of digital content production for social media. IPS-USA social media streams serve to inform over 160K followers of the latest developments in Palestine, and to highlight our publications including the Journal of Palestine Studies, Jerusalem Quarterly, and IPS-USA Books.

"Making the Desert Bloom": A Myth Examined

Late Israeli President Shimon Peres was quoted back in 1970 as saying, "The country [Palestine] was mostly an empty desert, with only a few islands of Arab settlement; and Israel's cultivable land today was indeed redeemed from swamp and wilderness." This central theme of early Zionist colonization of Palestine was refuted in this 1979 Journal of Palestine Studies article by Alan George.

Four Hours in Shatila

From September 16 to September 18, 1982 between 1,000-3,500 Palestinians were massacred by Phalangist militias supported by Israeli troops. "What can we say to their families who left with Arafat, trusting in the promises of Reagan, Mitterrand and Perini, who had assured them that the civilian population of the camps would be safe? How can we explain that we allowed children, old people and women to be massacred, and that we are abandoning their bodies without prayers? How can we tell them that we don't know where they are buried?"

Zionist Settler Colonialism

To commemorate the United Nation’s “International Day of the World’s Indigenous People,” on August 9th, the Institute for Palestine Studies is making available seven articles from the Journal of Palestine Studies archives that highlight the history of Zionist settler colonialism upon the indigenous people of Palestine and the current methods used which continue this process into the present day.

From the Small Zinzana to the Bigger Zinzana: Israeli Prisons, Palestinian Prisons

The Palestinian experience has been aptly characterized as carceralism, in both literal and metaphorical senses. It is arguable that ever since the 1967 occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, the most consensual pillar of national Palestinian discourse has been the issue of Palestinians imprisoned by Israel. After Hamas’s so-called takeover of Gaza in 2007, however, a new, intra- Palestinian carceralism emerged.

Newest Issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies, 179 Vol. 45, No. 3 (Spring 2016)

PALESTINE IN RECENT MONTHS has witnessed a new kind of continuous, low-level ferment that betokens many Palestinians’ profound disquiet with the status quo: Israel’s ever more entrenched military occupation and the ceaseless expansion of its colonization project. Predictions that this ferment would erupt into something bigger and more general, akin to the two intifadas of the past three decades, have proven misplaced.

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