Journal of Palestine Studies, Autumn 2018

2018 marked seventy years since the Nakba. As the Journal of Palestine Studies embarks on this New Year, we are pleased to offer a special issue that reflects on the anniversary in unprecedented ways while simultaneously looking to the future. The articles in “1948 and Its Shadows” engage what the curators describe as “dead zones in Palestinian history,” in an attempt to “mobilize for potential [future] histories.”

Exclusive: Are U.S. Newspapers Biased Against Palestinians? Analysis of A Hundred Thousand Headlines Says Yes

With the growth of the Palestine solidarity movement, the question is whether these and other news agencies will continue to tarnish their record by disregarding the facts about Palestine.

United Nations Inaction and the Gaza Crisis: Ten Years ago and Today

Ten years since Operation Cast Lead, UN obligations remain unfulfilled.

#TweetYourThobe: Honoring the First Palestinian-American Congresswoman

Palestinian women in the U.S. and around the world celebrated Rep. Tlaib’s inauguration and joined the campaign to share photos of their thobes.

"Making the Desert Bloom": A Myth Examined

Late Israeli President Shimon Peres was quoted back in 1970 as saying, "The country [Palestine] was mostly an empty desert, with only a few islands of Arab settlement; and Israel's cultivable land today was indeed redeemed from swamp and wilderness." This central theme of early Zionist colonization of Palestine was refuted in this 1979 Journal of Palestine Studies article by Alan George.

Four Hours in Shatila

From September 16 to September 18, 1982 between 1,000-3,500 Palestinians were massacred by Phalangist militias supported by Israeli troops. "What can we say to their families who left with Arafat, trusting in the promises of Reagan, Mitterrand and Perini, who had assured them that the civilian population of the camps would be safe? How can we explain that we allowed children, old people and women to be massacred, and that we are abandoning their bodies without prayers? How can we tell them that we don't know where they are buried?"

Zionist Settler Colonialism

To commemorate the United Nation’s “International Day of the World’s Indigenous People,” on August 9th, the Institute for Palestine Studies is making available seven articles from the Journal of Palestine Studies archives that highlight the history of Zionist settler colonialism upon the indigenous people of Palestine and the current methods used which continue this process into the present day.

From the Small Zinzana to the Bigger Zinzana: Israeli Prisons, Palestinian Prisons

The Palestinian experience has been aptly characterized as carceralism, in both literal and metaphorical senses. It is arguable that ever since the 1967 occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, the most consensual pillar of national Palestinian discourse has been the issue of Palestinians imprisoned by Israel. After Hamas’s so-called takeover of Gaza in 2007, however, a new, intra- Palestinian carceralism emerged.

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