Journal of Palestine Studies, Autumn 2018

2018 marked seventy years since the Nakba. As the Journal of Palestine Studies embarks on this New Year, we are pleased to offer a special issue that reflects on the anniversary in unprecedented ways while simultaneously looking to the future. The articles in “1948 and Its Shadows” engage what the curators describe as “dead zones in Palestinian history,” in an attempt to “mobilize for potential [future] histories.”

Exclusive: Are U.S. Newspapers Biased Against Palestinians? Analysis of A Hundred Thousand Headlines Says Yes

With the growth of the Palestine solidarity movement, the question is whether these and other news agencies will continue to tarnish their record by disregarding the facts about Palestine.

United Nations Inaction and the Gaza Crisis: Ten Years ago and Today

Ten years since Operation Cast Lead, UN obligations remain unfulfilled.

#TweetYourThobe: Honoring the First Palestinian-American Congresswoman

Palestinian women in the U.S. and around the world celebrated Rep. Tlaib’s inauguration and joined the campaign to share photos of their thobes.

The Nakba at 70

Seventy years on, Palestinians in Jerusalem continue to endure systematic attempts to force them out of their homes, while in the West Bank they struggle to remain in their ancestral homeland amid an ever-expanding settler-colonial project. In Gaza, where Palestinians are imprisoned en masse, they suffer the consequences of repeated military assaults and an ongoing siege, now in its 14th year. 

Who's Messianic Now?

The latest on Palestine Square, the blog of the Institute for Palestine Studies: "It may be difficult to digest America’s resort to pseudo-biblical literalism to engage with one of the world’s thorniest issues, laughable even. But, in Pence’s case, it is hardly a surprise."

Remembering the First Intifada: "I Was Detained by Mitzna"

Last month Palestinians marked 30 years since the First Intifada, which erupted on December 9, 1987. In this except from “The First Intifada: Hope and the Loss of Hope,” which appeared in the Autumn, 2017 issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies, Khalid Farraj recounts his own arrest by Israeli soldiers in March 1988 during a security sweep of Jalazun refugee camp, north of Ramallah. The sweep was led by Gen. Amram Mitzna, Israeli officer in charge of the Central Command (West Bank) at the time.

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